Health Library

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  • Talking With Your Child About Sex

    Offers tips on talking with your child about sex. Addresses family values. Covers getting conversations started. Covers topics such as using condoms and other forms of birth control to avoid pregnancy and STIs. Also covers sexual abuse and date rape.

  • Tips for Parents of Teens

    Parenting a teenager can be both challenging and rewarding. Many teens have conflicting feelings about growing up and aren't yet able to gracefully manage these emotions. They can be inconsistent with their affections, argumentative, and at times even hurtful. As your teen struggles with becoming independent, it is...

  • Quick Tips: Babyproofing Your Home

    To a baby's eyes, your home is one big playground. They see a lot of things to crawl under, climb on top of, pull down, touch, taste, and smell. It can be fun to watch your baby discover new things as your baby learns to crawl and walk. But it...

  • Meniscus Tear

    What is a meniscus tear? A meniscus tear is a common knee injury. The meniscus is a rubbery, C-shaped disc that cushions your knee. Each knee has two menisci (plural of meniscus)—one at the outer edge of the knee and one at the inner edge. They keep your knee steady...

  • Meniscus Tear

    What is a meniscus tear? A meniscus tear is a common knee injury. The meniscus is a rubbery, C-shaped disc that cushions your knee. Each knee has two menisci (plural of meniscus)—one at the outer edge of the knee and one at the inner edge. They keep your knee steady...

  • Meniscus Tear: Should I Have Surgery?

    Guides you through the decision to have surgery for a torn meniscus. Explains two kinds of surgery. Explains when surgery is done. Lists risks and benefits of surgery for meniscus tear. Includes interactive tool to help you decide.

  • Appreciating Your Child's Personality

    By the time a child starts school, your child's distinct temperament becomes more apparent. Every child has a unique way of feeling, thinking, and interacting with others. Some children are shy, while others are outgoing. Some are active, while others are calm. Some are fretful, while others are easygoing. Each...

  • Physical Development, Ages 15 to 18 Years

    In females: Most have had their first menstrual period by age 15. And most have completed the rapid growth spurt that usually occurs during puberty. Other early changes of puberty, such as the growth of pubic hair and breasts, have also occurred. Breast development is usually complete about 4 years...

  • Cognitive Development, Ages 15 to 18 Years

    By age 16, most teens are starting to think in abstract ways. They can deal with several concepts at the same time and imagine the future consequences of their actions. This type of thinking continues to develop into adulthood. Also by age 16, teens can learn to process more complex...

  • Emotional and Social Development, Ages 15 to 18 Years

    Older teens may seem mature at times, but they often will have times when they are not. Those who haven't yet established their own identity and sense of independence may try defining themselves through rebellious or difficult behavior. It's normal for teens to experiment with different looks and ideas. This...


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